Dog Body Language

Doggie Body Language
Doggie Body Language

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Doggie Body Language
Doggie Body Language

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Body Language of Fear in Dogs

 

Calm & Relaxed? or Shutdown?

Calm or Shutdown
Calm or Shutdown

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Calm or Shutdown
Calm or Shutdown

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Fear In Dogs
Fear In Dogs

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Fear In Dogs
Fear In Dogs

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Space Etiquette for Dogs

Space Etiquette 1
Space Etiquette 1

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Yellow Dog Project
Yellow Dog Project

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Space Etiquette 1
Space Etiquette 1

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Newsflash: Running up to another dog and ignoring requests to go away is not “friendly”, it is rude. Just like people, dogs need personal space! If a stranger came up to you and put his hand on you, you’d be allowed to step back, yell and push him away. Dogs have the same right to enforce their boundaries. Some dogs are called “reactive” because they are more sensitive than others. Reactive dogs are good dogs, they just need more distance and compassionate training.

 

You can help them by honoring their need for personal space.

  • Never let your off-leash dog go up to an on-leash dog.

  • Lock your retractable leash when you see other dogs (or better yet, don’t use them at all!).

  • Ask before approaching or petting any dog.

  • Have compassion for people with shy or reactive dogs.

  • Dogs wearing a yellow bandana or have a yellow ribbon on their leash could be a sign that dog needs extra space. It could be due to reactivity issues, health issues, healing from an injury, in training or being rehabilitated.

 

Dog Park Etiquette

Dog Park Rules
Dog Park Rules

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Dog Park Rules
Dog Park Rules

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Here are some tips to remember when visiting the dog park to help everyone get along. Always follow individual park rules and remember, not every dog is a good fit for the dog park and that is ok! There are other activities you can do with your dog if the dog park isn’t for them.

Tips to Remember

  • Train your dog to focus and interact in games with you instead of always interacting with other dogs.

  • Train your dog to come when called so you can call him away before he gets into problem situations. Once your dog is with you, keep him engaged with you, then release him to play again.

  • Your dog should learn that it is fun to focus on you and play with you instead of needing to always play with other dogs. It is ok to play and interact with other dogs as long as both dogs are relaxed and having fun!

  • Dogs don’t like groups or individual dogs rushing up to them. Keep your dog nearby when a new dog enters the area.

  • Don’t let your dog steal toys from other dogs or interfere with another dogs personal space.

  • Sometimes dogs can play too roughly with others. Supervise them when with other dogs and remove/redirect them if they are becoming too rough.

  • Don’t let your dog jump up or body slam other people at the park.

  • You wouldn’t ignore your kid at the park, so don’t ignore your dog either. It’s easy to get caught up talking with other dog parents but always keep an eye on your pooch!

  • Always pick up after your dog so the park can remain an enjoyable place for all!